Saturday, May 3, 2014

Pincher Creek Minor Baseball Association statement about recent events

Pincher Creek Minor Baseball Association

A situation arose with the Junior team this last week and it quickly escalated due to inappropriate use of the social media. The board has discussed the incident and decided to release a statement. The PCMB board made this decision in order to fully inform the public and hopefully put a stop to all the negativity and perhaps get back to what is important, playing baseball.


There are two sides to a story and by now, we hope most have heard them both. The board, as well as many of the parents on this team feels it is important to stand behind the coach involved. It comes down to respect an all parties, respect for the sport, your team and your coach. Playing on a team is not a right just like having a job is not your right. A person has to want it and perhaps even earn it, it is a privilege and sometimes people forget that. Of course we want all kids to play, but we also want them to respect/appreciate being on a team, and for the people that volunteer their time to ensure that privilege.

Each team has its own rules/guidelines, whatever you choose to call them, just like each employer has their own rules or each teacher has rules for their classroom. It is important we teach our children this early and explain that you may not agree or like the rules, but if you want to play, work or be in the classroom, you must abide by them or there will be consequences. Its called respect.

This coach has had the same rule for a number of years now as many boys will attest to. It was not a way to single out any player or force his will on anyone. It was in his words “respect for the sport, the team and yourself.” He did not ever say how short it had to be, “just make an effort”. Every boy on the team did just that because they want to play baseball except for one. He said “No”, right from the start. No explanation until days later when all the wrong actions were already starting to take place. Every situation is resolvable when dealt with in the appropriate channels. The parent in this situation knows very well what these channels should have been but she chose not to use them and instead manipulated the situation using social media. This is totally unacceptable if not only because it sets a terrible example for our children. There was no respect in this situation whatsoever.

The board believes fully in the coach’s values and expectations for these boys.

This isn’t a form of bullying or power tripping. It is a case of setting up expectations for a team and expecting everyone to try to live up to them.

Thank you!

Pincher Creek Minor Baseball Executive

33 comments:

  1. Well said. I hope this goes to all the news services the original article went to.

    ReplyDelete
  2. Anonymous3/5/14

    Yes, well, I suppose we should continue to follow the ways of the past- it's clear that people were far more open-minded than they are now... Oh. Wait, no, you people are stuck in the past. My bad.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Anonymous4/5/14

      I wonder if a Native Indian with traditional long hair played for his team, would he tell him to cut his hair, and what does he think the answer and precussions would be from that? I played minor baseball in Pincher Creek 35 years ago and I myself and other boys had long hair and nobody ever asked us to cut it. My coach put the emphasis on having fun and learning the game of baseball. Most boys in the 70's and 80's had long hair except the boys that were forced to have buzz cuts by their parents.

      Delete
  3. Anonymous3/5/14

    Nicely put!! People choose to play, or not to play, for different teams or coaches for all kinds of reasons. These kids have chosen to play for Brian and his assistant coaches for several years and their parents have supported it. As a team they have been able to function and develop as individuals. It's a working, organized group, that anyone can make a choice to join if they want to make it a priority. We all have choices. Plenty are choosing Brian, baseball, and the expectations that are a part of that team. The majority, board included are okay with how things have been working for 6 years. It's a shame that the team and board had to be put through this unsavory experience when the parent involved knows first hand how to write, and hold others accountable to, policy and procedure.
    May the rest of their season be enjoyable!

    ReplyDelete
  4. Anonymous3/5/14

    Although I may agree or disagree with the coach's stance regarding the length of hair one child has chosen to wear, unfortunately or fortunately, today's society does not allow for us as individuals to place our own views onto another. I hope Minor Baseball has a large bank account - this sounds like a Human Rights Case in front of your eyes.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Les weir5/5/14

      G'day,
      It does indeed. Over here in Australia, we have the Anti Discrimination Board. I guess it is similar to your Human Rights people. This case would be up there like a shot. This boy has grown his hair for the best part of a year, and all of a sudden, it becomes an issue. The PCMBA talks of respect, for the game and the coach, but what about respect for the player, and what he is trying to achieve. I think young Liam deserves far more respect and admiration for what he is doing, than both the coach and the rubber stamping Pincher Creek Minor Baseball Executive.
      regards,
      Les W

      Delete
  5. Anonymous3/5/14

    I guess you have to be one of the minority non canadians to leave your hair long in order to play

    ReplyDelete
  6. Joanne Cyr, motherof 3 sport players3/5/14

    We are talking about hair not the talent that this individual can bring to the team.
    As said in the above article,
    "It was not a way to single out any player or force his will on anyone. It was in his words “respect for the sport, the team and yourself."
    Respect for the sport- this is baseball. We watch it to see how many home runs they get or how many strikes are made, not how their hair looks at the game.
    Respect for the team- baseball is a team sport their is no "I" in team. The team plays together, works together and learns together.
    Respect for himself- this individual is showing his team mates that he will stand up for what he believes in and that is donating his hair to cancer.
    Another statement from above is,
    "He did not ever say how short it had to be, “just make an effort”."
    So if this individual has cut an inch off his hair would this be making an effort?

    ReplyDelete
  7. Anonymous4/5/14

    Just wanting to be clear. There is violation or discrimination of the players Human Rights. The length of an individuals hair is not a protected ground. The player did not have long hair based on fath or religious belief. It is truly no different than the coach saying "no piercings or temporary tattoos". He has the ability to set up tje dress code for his team. Which he has consistantly enforced. The player chose to play on his team knowing this. I actually think the parent set a terrible example by filming someone without their consent and placing it on social medai instead of following the process for filling complaints directly with the league. No accountability to follow rules by player or parent.

    ReplyDelete
  8. Anonymous4/5/14

    I wonder how well dinosaurs do in court? Maybe how this mother approached this problem is a symptom of the fact that your executive has a reputation for not responding to complaints about this coach (for years).

    ReplyDelete
  9. This comment has been removed by the author.

    ReplyDelete
  10. Anonymous4/5/14

    THANK YOU THANK YOU!!!! So happy to hear this...Pincher Creek Minor Baseball has my VOTE!!!

    ReplyDelete
  11. Anonymous4/5/14

    So if the coach, or even the (or his) rules say "no long hair" i assume they even more differentiate by religion, skin-colour and political views?
    Poor poor Amercia.

    Greetings from Germany

    ReplyDelete
  12. Anonymous4/5/14

    So to break this down:

    "Each team has its own rules/guidelines, whatever you choose to call them, just like each employer has their own rules or each teacher has rules for their classroom. It is important we teach our children this early and explain that you may not agree or like the rules, but if you want to play, work or be in the classroom, you must abide by them or there will be consequences. Its called respect."

    You get a job at a Wal-Mart. You're a Muslim. You wear a hijab. Wal-Mart has a dress code that says no hats. You wear it anyway because it's what you believe in, and it's what you CHOOSE to do - and it IS your RIGHT and RESPONSIBILITY to have a job and pay your bills. To say you couldn't come to work and perform your job to make a living based on your appearance is discriminatory and in this case could be perceived as oppressive... so your employer accommodates.

    You're a police officer. You're Sikh. You wear a Turban, and have a long beard with long hair underneath that Turban. You wear the Turban, and your Commanding Officers go as far as to accommodate you. They RESPECT your willingness to serve and what YOU offer - and it IS your RIGHT and RESPONSIBILITY to have a job and pay your bills. To remove you from your duty or deny you the right to earn your keep based on your appearance would be discriminatory, and in this case could be interpreted as racist.

    You're a baseball player with long hair. Maybe it's a personal fashion choice, maybe it's for kids with Cancer, and maybe it's just in worship of the Fudgsicle People of Rigel XI - It doesn't matter. You want to play baseball. You live in Canada. You are in the year 2014 - a progressive time where we learn to accept people due to their differences, so the last thing you expect is for someone you are entrusting to train you and encourage you in a game you love to discriminate you... but your trust has been violated.

    You live in Pincher Creek, Alberta, and you're on the board for the Pincher Creek Minor Baseball Association. You are undoubtedly faced with problems every day about things that really don't matter in the real world, but they matter to your inner circle and those whom you believe can affect your precious "reputation". Through "the social media", you have been outed and are scrambling to defend your friend, your coworker, your husband or whatever for an asinine decision that has now blown up in his and your face.

    You have reinstated the reputation of small town Alberta. The horrible, backwards, redneck, living-in-the-past, inconsiderate, taking-yourselves-way-too-seriously reputation of small town Alberta. You have proven that in the times where people only believed that white people "looked like baseball players", you believe it was acceptable. You have proven that in the times where men, and only men, "looked like baseball players" was okay too.

    Thank heavens this kid had long hair and was an easy target - nobody will come down on you as much as if he were native, gay or some other backwards reason you could come up with to hate. Instead, you worried about your precious reputation - and in the same time are shaming yourselves and those around you.

    I post anonymously because as a person in the media, it's not my job to take sides. Not that it matters - in the court of public opinion, you're already eating enough of a crap sandwich.

    Good job.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Anonymous4/5/14

      Well said! Well said!!

      Delete
    2. Anonymous4/5/14

      You just said what many of us are thinking! way to go

      Delete
    3. Anonymous4/5/14

      Who is hating anyone? Whoa!!!!

      Delete
  13. Anonymous4/5/14

    My father coached many travel teams, both baseball & hockey - he didn't care how long or short the hair was - as long as it was kept neat... When the teams travelled to other venues, the kids were dressed up - NO JEANS! They wore shirts and ties, dress slacks, and blazers.... They looked pretty darn sharp, the hair was NEAT..... My father was complimented so many times for having the sharpest looking teams when they visited other venues....

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Anonymous4/5/14

      Awesome comment and a very good point...

      Delete
    2. Anonymous4/5/14

      What if a kid demanded that he get to wear jeans? It's only jeans? Would your dad just say that's okay?

      Delete
  14. Anonymous4/5/14

    The board should be ashamed of themselves.This is a kids sport not a paid position that has requirements. Guess it would be better if he was out on the streets getting into trouble. When he signs his contract with the Yankees they can demand short hair no facial hair until then let the kid play baseball.

    ReplyDelete
  15. Anonymous4/5/14

    Well, of course, playing the GAME of baseball with neat, short hair is monumentally more important than the character building quest of helping one's fellow human being in their time of need. Pincher Creek MBA - the 'civilized' world is embarrassed for you. Way to go! PLAY BALL!!
    - Vienna, Austria

    ReplyDelete
  16. Willow4/5/14

    For goodness sake, coach and board, it's hair! So long as it is tied back and does not interfere with the playing of the game, why would the coach care? He's not trying to cheat by taking anabolic steroids or ambushing the other teams. Focus on the game, people, not one person's view of what is an acceptable hairstyle for teenaged boys.

    I am saddened that the beautiful town and people of Pincher Creek are likely going to be pulled into a messy, divisive and long lawsuit.

    ReplyDelete
  17. Anonymous4/5/14

    This is my third year helping coach ball and my hair is halfway down my back. Those who don't like it have kept it to themselves so far. The thing is that we need more coaches and parent volunteers all the time. The simple fact that this guy will use that to get his deluded autocratic way is evidence enough that he is not suitable for a position of authority over children. It's people like him who use that kind of unquestionable authority to sexually abuse those under their control. Whether he is capable of it or not, he sets up kids to not question authority and thereby exposing them to greater risk.

    He, PCMBA and the parents of Pincher Creek need to be educated on the negative effect this kind of inappropriate behaviour can have on kids. Until that happens I hope someone else will step up and coach the team.

    ReplyDelete
  18. Sam Halverson4/5/14

    Mr Mackenzie is a disgrace to the game of baseball with his warped definition of respect. Baseball is a game that requires strong teamwork between members and that includes the coach. Respect is a two way street and, quite clearly, he wants it but doesn't want to give any. Even though the video only shows three minutes of the conversation, it was obvious that the coach had no justification for the hair 'rule'. He was set in his ways and his inability to adapt should send alarm bells ringing about his coaching ability and ethics.

    I understand why the Pincher Creek Minor Baseball Association feels the need to stand up for their coach, but the above statement only goes to show that the association doesn't understand why the situation has gained so much attention on social media. Perhaps they should take a step back and figure it out for themselves.

    ReplyDelete
  19. Anonymous4/5/14

    What a joke. Just because he has long hair he doesn't respect himself? Give me a break!!

    ReplyDelete
  20. Anonymous4/5/14

    Girls play with ponytails. Is this a gender-stereotype thing? Homophobia, much?

    ReplyDelete
  21. Anonymous4/5/14

    Get off the hair issue. Bad rule. Beware people you have all opened yourselves to being secretly recorded. Careful what you say and do and pray that some vindictive person doesn't choose to nail you to the internet cross. Volunteer coaches play each child equally and never, never yell at them because someone will ave it on there phone and you will be accused of discrimation and racism. The fact everyone has ignored this part of the story is naive. Some where sometime a good teacher, coach, parent will fall to this type of social media bullying. Good luck.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Anonymous4/5/14

      Exactly!! For all of you who thought it wise of the dolphin president to use social media to solve this problem may you all live your lives perfectly and please everyone!!

      Delete
  22. Anonymous4/5/14

    This is the issue... not hair, not egos, not homophobia or pedophilia (good grief people!) But as I said earlier, she undermined her message with her method. Who's the bully... ?

    ReplyDelete
  23. Anonymous4/5/14

    To comment clean it up seems reasonable if long or short hair, you look unkempt. Otherwise calling out long hair for being long is indeed discriminatory. In any case, manipulation or not the end result here is a kids not playing baseball and a coach may have crossed the line. Just saying.

    ReplyDelete
  24. Anonymous4/5/14

    I want to say thank you to the mother who was wise enough to record the arrogance of the coach and to post it for the world to see. For in doing so it not only revealed his character which in my opinion seemed severely lacking but also gave ample opportunity to reveal where the board stood as well. To major on such a minor thing really saddened me. Seeing the clip of the coach in action made me wonder why anyone would have him in that position. I guess if everyone at Pincher Creek suffers from the same narrow minded and short sighted point of view then this is what you end up with. Wow! Hope that learning to play ball is the only thing the kids are learning from that coach because it would be sad to see them grow up to behave like him and the board. Dennis from the US

    ReplyDelete
  25. Anonymous5/5/14

    May I suggest you read an article in the Calgary Herald titled CBE Backtracks on Wheelchair Rugby Ban. Here is an example of how a conflict is properly handled. Think how differently this could have turned out if someone secretly recorded any number of conversations before it was resolved and posted them. Instead the parties involved sat down and dealt with it before it became an ugly mess. Instead of the mud slinging circus we have, the media is reporting a story of how people can come together, work together and everyone gets to play.

    ReplyDelete

Infinite Scroll